Who is McCoy Tyner? Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife (Aisha Tyner), Children, Cause of Death, Net Worth | Wikibious

Who is McCoy Tyner? Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife (Aisha Tyner), Children, Cause of Death, Net Worth

McCoy Tyner Wiki – Biography

McCoy Tyner was an American jazz pianist known for his work with the John Coltrane Quartet and a long solo career. American musician, who played with John Coltrane, was seen as one of the most influential jazz pianists of all time.

Tyner was born in 1938 and began studying the piano at the age of 13. He joined the John Coltrane quartet in 1960. “We got along very well,” Tyner later said of his relationship with Coltrane. “We had a good feeling for each other, similar conceptually as far as music was concerned. I knew that is where I needed to be. I was really anxious and excited about it.”

In 1959, Tyner joined trumpeter Art Farmer and saxophonist Benny Golson in a group they called The Jazztet; he appeared on its first album, released the following year. That same year, 1960, Tyner played on Coltrane’s album My Favorite Things; his tolling, meditative chords on the title track, a popular song borrowed from the hit Broadway musical The Sound of Music, were a key part of its allure.

McCoy Tyner Age

He was 81 years old.

Wife Aisha Tyner

Tyner was married to his wife, Aisha Tyner. The marriage ended in the 1980s.

Children

McCoy Tyner had 3 children during his marriage to Aisha Tyner.

Career

In 1960, Tyner joined the Jazztet led by Benny Golson and Art Farmer. Six months later, he joined the quartet of John Coltrane that included Jimmy Garrison and Elvin Jones. He worked with the band during its extended run at the Jazz Gallery, replacing Steve Kuhn (Coltrane had known Tyner for a while in Philadelphia, and performed one of the pianist’s compositions, “The Believer”, as early as 1958).

He played on Coltrane’s My Favorite Things for Atlantic. The band toured almost non-stop between 1961 and 1965, recording the albums Live! at the Village Vanguard, Ballads, Live at Birdland, Crescent, A Love Supreme, and The John Coltrane Quartet Plays for Impulse!.

While in Coltrane’s group, he recorded albums as a leader in a piano trio. He also appeared as a sideman on many Blue Note albums of the 1960s, although he was often credited as “etc.” on the cover of these albums to respect his contract with Impulse! Records.

The classic John Coltrane Quartet — with Tyner, Jimmy Garrison on bass and Elvin Jones on drums — formally coalesced in 1962. For the next several years it created at a prodigious pace, recording landmark albums like Crescent and A Love Supreme, and setting a fearsome bar for intensity on the bandstand. Recordings like Live at Birdland have been prized by generations of musicians and fans; in 2005 another live document, Live at the Half Note: One Down, One Up, left another major impression, 40 years after its recording date.

Tyner stayed with Coltrane until soon after that recording, as the music grew more cacophonous, rhythmically abstract and untethered from root tonality. His piano chair was passed on to Alice Coltrane, who quickly made it her own.

“I was so immersed in the music when I was with John,” Tyner told me in 1997. “The influence was so great, and the roles we all played in that group were so powerful; you couldn’t divorce yourself from it just because you weren’t physically there. For a while there, all the horn players that were with me wanted to sound like John. So I deliberately started using alto sax instead of tenor, and other instruments, because I wanted to kind of try something different.”

But the intrepid tone and earnest spiritualism in Coltrane’s music carried over into Tyner’s — especially during a feverish stretch in the 1970s, on a series of searching, Afrocentric albums like Extensions and Sahara. The critic Gary Giddins, reflecting on the 1970s in The Village Voice, once pegged Tyner “the most influential pianist of the decade,” an assessment that could credibly be extended outside that frame.

Death Cause

McCoy Tyner, a pianist whose deep resonance, hammering attack and sublime harmonic invention made him a game-changing catalyst in jazz and beyond, died Friday, March 6, at his home in New Jersey. His death was confirmed by his manager. No cause of death was given. He was 81.

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Tyner was the last surviving member of the John Coltrane Quartet, among the most momentous groups in jazz history. Few musicians have ever exerted as much influence as a sideman. His crucial role in the group’s articulation of modal harmony, from the early 1960s on, will always stand as a defining achievement: The ringing intervals in his left hand, often perfect fourths or fifths, became the cornerstone of a style that endures today.

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The world lost a musical treasure today. Sad to announce the death of my Uncle McCoy Tyner. Grew up in West Philadelphia started playing the piano at 13 in the back of my grandmother’s hair shop playing for the ladies getting their hair done. At 22 he joined the Jazzlet which featured Benny Golson then a few months later he joined the great John Coltrane’s quartet. After that he would set out on his own releasing over 70 plus albums from the 60’s thru the 2000’s. Toured the world multiple times. Nominated for 12 Grammys won 5. We shared the same birthday. One of the worlds greatest jazz pianists. Rest in paradise Unc… #ripmccoytyner

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It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of jazz legend, Alfred “McCoy” Tyner.

McCoy was an inspired musician who devoted his life to his art, his family and his spirituality.

McCoy Tyner’s music and legacy will continue to inspire fans and future talent for generations to come.

The Tyner family is grateful for your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time, and respectfully requests that any inquiries be directed to info@algbrands.com

Net Worth

Tyner net worth will update soon.

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